Events

Second Tuesday Talks

The YCCC is running a free series of ‘Second Tuesday Talks’. These informal talks will be held via Zoom at 19:00 on the second Tuesday of each month, from July to September.

The talks will vary slightly in format, but each event will be around one hour long and provide ample time for audience questions. We hope that you will take the opportunity to hear these fascinating talks, and we welcome suggestions for future topics.

 

The Roof of Notre-Dame: the 2019 Fire and its Aftermath

Date: Tuesday 11th August 2020

Time: 19:00-20:00 (GMT)

Location: Online (Zoom)

Speaker: Andrew Arrol (Arrol Architects)

Please register for this event via Zoom.

Registration is free and you won’t need a Zoom account to join the webinar.

 

 

In the second of our summer series of Second Tuesday Talks, Andrew Arrol (Arrol Architects) will talk about the roof of Notre-Dame, which was destroyed during a devastating fire on 15 April 2019. Andrew, who was able to visit the cathedral nearly twenty years ago, following storm damage to the pinnacles, will provide an overview of the historic interior of the roof and the steeple over the crossing. In the summer of 2019, Andrew took the opportunity to revisit Notre-Dame, while in Paris researching stone cutting technology for York Minster. He will use the photographs taken during his visit to outline the damage caused by the fire, and the work which was being undertaken to stabilise the building while he was there. Finally, Andrew will discuss some of the proposals made for the reinstatement of the roof, providing a starting point for a question session on the ethics and practicalities of responding to the extensive losses and damage caused by the fire.

About the Speaker

Andrew Arrol RIBA AABC, is the Managing Director and Principal Architect at Arrol Architects. Andrew has dedicated his career to historic building repair and conservation. He has worked on numerous projects for scheduled monuments, Grade I and Grade II* listed buildings, as well as buildings of many different periods, styles and constructions methods. Andrew is particularly experienced in the conservation of medieval masonry structures, and has served on numerous fabric advisory committees and commissions, as well as acting as Cathedral Architect for Chester Cathedral. Since 2005, Andrew has served as Surveyor to the Fabric of York Minster. In this role, from which he will retire later this year, he oversaw the large-scale repair and conservation of the Minster’s east end, as well as the major reorganisation of visitor and worshipper facilities. Andrew is an active member of many professional associations and societies that promote and develop best practice in conservation.


Past Events

Second Tuesday Talks

Fitting the Old to the New: Designing New Ironwork for Heritage Settings

Date: Tuesday 14th July 2020

Time: 19:00-20:00 (GMT)

Location: Online (Zoom)

Speaker: Bethan Griffiths (The Ironwork Studio)

Please register for this event via Zoom.

Registration is free and you won’t need a Zoom account to join the webinar.

 

In the first of our summer series Second Tuesday Talks, Bethan Griffiths (The Ironwork Studio) will explore how new ironwork is designed for heritage settings.

New designs in heritage settings will always stimulate debate. Whether the design is reticent and recessive, or boldly contemporary, there will always be vehement advocates for and against the outcome.

So how do you go about creating an imaginative and confident response, derived from the context, which not only respects but enhances historic surroundings?

Bethan will explore design approaches to new work in historic settings, illustrating her discussion with case studies. She will look at how, as designers, we can understand, respond to and engage with, the unique places for which they are commissioned.

Although this talk focuses upon ironwork, the same issues relate to other craft disciplines.

In Conversation

Following her talk, Bethan will be joined by World Heritage Site Conservation Officer, Adrian Neilson, and award-winning Conservation Architect, Rhys Brookes, for a 30-minute Q&A session. This will enable the audience to hear the different perspectives of all those involved the process of designing new ironwork for heritage settings, reflecting the collaboration between craftsperson, architect and conservation officer. Together they will answer delegates’ questions and expand the discussion, where appropriate, to give a more rounded outlook.

This is your opportunity to ask a question you’ve always wanted to put to a conservation officer, architect or craftsperson about designing new ironwork for heritage settings.

 

About the Speaker

Bethan Griffiths, director of The Ironwork Studio, is a specialist designer and consultant in decorative architectural ironwork. Beautiful work, skilfully crafted is at the heart of what she offers, providing inspiration and expert knowledge to both create and restore ironwork.

Her passion for metalwork, especially blacksmithing, developed while studying for her BA in Three-Dimensional Design. This has led to her being involved in a wide range of prominent projects from a new contemporary Bandstand for a World Heritage Site to the restoration of Grade 1 listed work. In giving something back to her craft, Bethan has been involved in many voluntary projects. Most recently she is significantly involved with the development of guidelines, training and accreditation for the restoration of heritage ironwork through her position as Trustee for the National Heritage Ironwork Group (NHIG).

About the Question Panel

Adrian Neilson is currently Senior Conservation Officer in the World Heritage City of Bath. After studying history at the University of Exeter he went on to study for an MA in archaeology at the University of Bristol. Adrian started his architectural conservation career 16 years ago working with specialist conservation contractors as a conservator, managing sites conserving a diverse range of historic buildings in the South West of England, including many mediaeval churches. During this time he studied for an MSc in the Conservation of Historic Buildings at the University of Bath before embarking on career in local government as a Historic Buildings Officer. Adrian is involved in the conservation and reinstatement of architectural ironwork, advising and working closely with conservation architects and community groups. He is a member of the IHBC, Chartered Institute for Archaeology and in 2018 was invited to be on the Council of the NHIG.

Rhys Brookes trained as an Architect at Bath University, graduating in 1989. His initial experience was gained working on a selection of Grade I listed classical buildings such as the temples at Stowe garden and a range of stately homes. He completed the Post Graduate Diploma of Conservation at the Architectural Association, London in 1997. Rhys’ work is driven by a desire to ‘crack the code’ of buildings, unpicking the rationale and evolution of their form, construction and materials in order to make informed decisions about repairs or adaptations. He uses his skill and aptitude for traditional drafting techniques to explore the geometry and proportions that create harmony in new design and facilitate historical analysis.

Please register for this event via Zoom. Registration is free and you won’t need a Zoom account to join the webinar.

For more information, please email our Conservation Research Officer, Katie Harrison.


Conservation and Craft Myths: A Window into the YCCC World

Date: Tuesday 16th June 2020

Time: 19:00-20:30 (GMT)

Location: Online (Zoom)

This online event showcased the work of four Consortium members, who each provided a fifteen-minute presentation on the myths they encounter in their field and answered questions from the audience. We were joined by over 140 members and non-members!

 

Preconceptions: About the Colour of Ironwork

Bethan Griffiths, The Ironwork Studio

We live in a world of many and varied colours, from bright and bold to subtle and calm, and we make full use of this wide palette to decorate our built environment.  So why is it that when it comes to heritage ironwork that the majority of people automatically think of black as the appropriate colour? This presentation aims to explode the ‘always black’ myth and will explore a range of historic colours and influences on colour fashions.

 

 

Changing the Ethics of Stained Glass Restoration

Keith Barley, Barley Studio

As a result of fashion, unregulated restoration practices and disturbing results in the 19th and early 20th centuries, conservation regulations and ethics were established. Historic windows were to be treated as ancient objects, best left as found. The journey to dispel these established ethics has been challenging in the face of opposition. Over the last fifty years, the collaboration of art historians and conservator/restorers has driven a shift towards the treatment of ancient windows as objects of art, as well as artefacts. The restoration of York Minster’s Great East window, guided by the East Window Advisory Group, demonstrates the development of present-day ethics.

 

What is a Photograph? Can it be Conserved?

Susie Clark, Paper and Photographic Conservator and Consultant

There is a myth in conservation that photographs are difficult to treat and fraught with danger for conservators. There is also a myth amongst some of the wider public that perhaps nothing can be done with a damaged photograph. This presentation will provide a brief introduction to photographs and show that it is often possible to improve their condition.

 

 

 

Exposed Churches: The Myth That Has Left Churches Undressed

Matthias Garn, Matthias Garn Master Mason + Partner

We are used to seeing our historic stone churches as just that- stone buildings, often in a state of erosion or disrepair. For the medieval builder, however, many churches today would appear undressed, both inside and outside. They are missing one fundamental layer, their protective coating, their “raincoat”.  I will briefly explore the modern assumption that stone churches always looked as they do now and consider how this assumption is damaging to the future care of these important buildings.

 

About the Speakers

Keith Barley, Barley Studio

Keith Barley MBE MA CF FMGP ACR is internationally renowned in stained glass conservation, especially for the environmental protection of vulnerable stained glass. He was awarded the MBE in in 2015 ‘for service to cultural restoration and conservation’, in particular for his work at St Mary’s Church, Fairford, which also formed the subject of his MA by Research awarded by the University of York in 2017.

Keith is an ICON accredited conservator (ACR), conservation adviser to the UK Corpus Vitrearum Medii Aevi (CVMA), Fellow of the British Society of Master Glass Painters (FMGP) and of the Winston Churchill Memorial Trust (CF). Keith was the Master of the Worshipful Company of Glaziers and Painters of Glass for 2017-18, one of the few practising glaziers to be given this honour. In 2020 Keith received the Master Certificate Award given by the Worshipful Company of Glaziers.

Susie Clark, Paper and Photographic Conservator and Consultant

Susie Clark ACR is a paper and photographic conservator and consultant. She was previously the conservator for the BBC Hulton Picture Library, (later Getty Images). Since 1990 she has been a freelance conservator working in this country and abroad for institutions and private clients. In 1996 she was the recipient of the Museums and Galleries Commission Jerwood Conservation Award for Research and Innovation. More recently, she was also the conservator for the joint National Science and Media Museum and Getty Conservation Institute research project on the identification of photographs.

Bethan Griffiths, The Ironwork Studio

Bethan Griffiths, director of The Ironwork Studio, is a specialist designer and consultant in decorative architectural ironwork. Beautiful work, skilfully crafted is at the heart of what she offers, providing inspiration and expert knowledge to both create and restore ironwork.

Her passion for metalwork, especially blacksmithing, developed while studying for her BA in Three-Dimensional Design. This has led to her being involved in a wide range of prominent projects from a new contemporary Bandstand for a World Heritage Site to the restoration of Grade 1 listed work.

In giving something back to her craft, Bethan has been involved in many voluntary projects. Most recently she is significantly involved with the development of guidelines, training and accreditation for the restoration of heritage ironwork through her position as Trustee for the National Heritage Ironwork Group (NHIG).

Matthias Garn, Matthias Garn Master Mason + Partner

Matthias has worked in the stone industry for 30 years. Following his apprenticeship in Dresden, Germany, he worked in a number of stonemasonry and carving workshops in Europe before moving to England in 1998 to work for Wells Cathedral Stonemasons and then for Dick Reid’s workshop in York.

Matthias runs his own stone business- specialising in the conservation and repair of historic stone structures. He is a German Master in Stonemasonry and Stone Carving, a member of the Worshipful Company of Masons, a Freeman of the City of London, a SPAB Fellow and a member of the Historic England Conservation Committee.

He is a frequent lecturer, teacher and advisor in the field of historic stone conservation.

 

 

For more information about this event, please email our Conservation Research Officer, Katie Harrison.